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News for Cognitive Recovery

Showing 1 - 6 of 27 total
Spot a stroke fast, face, arm, speech, time to call 911
NEWS: 
Article
Stroke affects over 795,000 people in the U.S. alone each year, that is one person every 40 seconds. Dr. Tomoko Kitago, lab director of the Human Motor Recovery Laboratory at the Burke Neurological Institute, talks about stroke awareness, treatments and the importance of clinical trials.
Photo of Raj, Saravanan, Amit, and Yingxin
NEWS: 
Article
The research team examined how myeloid cells can also facilitate repair by clearing debris and promoting tissue remodeling during the early stages of repair. The study showed that a transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor, which the Ratan lab has been studying for years, marks myeloid cells that are associated with good long term recovery.
Gibson Team in the Lab
NEWS: 
In the Media
Media Outlet: 
CNN Health
Benfotiamine and Cognitive Decline in Alzheimer's Disease, a small exploratory clinical trial, conducted by Dr. Gary E. Gibson’s laboratory at the Burke Neurological Institute is listed in CNN Health’s article on ”Top 2020 health stories you may have missed because of Covid-19” under Advances in Alzheimer’s.
Photo of Gibson Lab
NEWS: 
Article
A small exploratory clinical trial conducted by Dr. Gary E. Gibson’s laboratory at the Burke Neurological Institute in collaboration with physicians at the Burke Rehabilitation Hospital, suggests that Benfotiamine is safe and potentially efficacious in improving cognitive outcomes among people living with Mild Cognitive Impairment and mild Alzheimer’s disease (AD).
Cho Lab at Zoom meeting and in lab
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Article

As we carry on with our mission during the COVID-19 pandemic, Burke Neurological Institute (BNI) is slowly and safely bringing back laboratory personnel to campus.

Aphasia Journal Club Zoom Meeting
NEWS: 
Social Media
The Aphasia Journal Club meets online every Friday. It's a great opportunity to discuss not only language and aphasia—a language deficit that often follows stroke—but also clinical research in general.