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Dr. Jian Zhong & BMRI Colleagues Awarded funding to visualize reformation of spinal circuits as they are happening.

Lowey Announces $3.1 Million in NIH Funding for Burke Medical Research Institute

NEWS: 
Press Release
Awarded By: 
National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Published Media: 
lowey.house.gov

White Plains, NY -- Congresswoman Nita Lowey (D-NY17/Rockland-Westchester) today announced $3,125,875 in federal funding over the next five years for Burke Medical Research Institute (BMRI) in White Plains. The funding was allocated through the U.S. National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), and BMRI will use this funding for the pioneering study of spinal cord injury.

“Advances in scientific research hold tremendous potential to help people suffering from spinal cord injuries lead full and independent lives,” said Congresswoman Lowey. “This federal funding will enable Burke Medical Research Institute to continue to lead in cutting-edge research and innovation on spinal-cord rehabilitation that has the potential to improve thousands of lives. As Ranking Member of the House Appropriations Committee, I will continue working to bring these essential resources to the Lower Hudson Valley.”

“The grant is a collaboration with a leading imaging group at Cornell University in Ithaca that will allow Dr. Jian Zhong, Director of the Molecular Regeneration Laboratory at Burke Medical Research Institute, and his colleagues here at BMRI to visualize reformation of spinal circuits as they are happening,” said Dr. Rajiv R. Ratan, Executive Director of the Burke Medical Research Institute. “This exciting new potential may be relevant for the repair of the brain and spinal cord not only after spinal injury but also may pave a successful path for treatment of an array of conditions including stroke, Alzheimer’s disease, and traumatic brain injury.”

Research project grants funded by NINDS are highly competitive. The projected success rate at NINDS is only 20%.