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Drug Discovery

Impact

RESEARCH PROJECT: 
In Progress
Thiamine (vitamin B1) dependent processes are reduced in Alzheimer’s disease. Thiamine deficiency mimics many aspects of Alzheimer’s disease including the reduced glucose metabolism and exaggeration of the plaque and tangle pathology.
PUBLICATION: 
Journal Article
Ivanova E, Kovacs-Oller T, Sagdullaev BT.
J Neurosci. 2017 Aug 9;37(32):7580-7594. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.0187-17.2017. Epub 2017 Jul 3.
Abstract on PubMed
GRANT: 
Non-Federal
September 1, 2017 to August 31, 2020
Grant Number: 
DOH01-FLLOW2-2016-00006
New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH)
Spinal Cord Injury Research Board (SCIRB)
Investigators: 
Principal Investigator
EVENT: 
Weekly Seminar
Tuesday, May 23, 2017 - 12:30pm
Billings Building – Rosedale
Oswald Steward, Ph.D.
Guest Speaker
NEWS: 
In the Media
Media Outlet: 
Annals of Neurology
The Board of Trustees, Faculty and Staff of the Burke Medical Research Institute, an affiliate of Weill Cornell Medicine mourn the loss of our founder, friend and colleague.
Fletcher McDowell, M.D., Founder of Burke Medical Research Institute
EVENT: 
Weekly Seminar
Tuesday, May 2, 2017 - 12:30pm
Billings Building – Rosedale
EVENT: 
Weekly Seminar
Tuesday, March 21, 2017 - 12:30pm
Billings Building – Rosedale
EVENT: 
Weekly Seminar
Tuesday, May 9, 2017 - 12:30pm
Billings Building – Rosedale
RESEARCH PROJECT: 
In Progress
Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency (TD) produces a mild, chronic impairment of oxidative metabolism that models the diminished metabolism and reduced activities of the thiamine-dependent mitochondrial enzymes that occur in brain in several common age-related neurodegenerative disorders.
NEWS: 
Article

On March 2nd, a manuscript from the Burke Medical Research Institute describing a novel drug for improving outcomes following brain hemorrhage was published in Science’s sister journal, Science Translational Medicine.

BMRI Researchers Discover a Novel Drug to Prevent Brain Bleeding