Early Brain Injury Recovery Clinic
Research Projects

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Our end goal is to enroll children with brain injuries into clinical trials to test new modalities for treatment, such as high intensity training programs and non-invasive brain stimulation. These treatments will employ the understanding gained from basic research programs at the Burke Medical Research Institute to create safe and practical treatments to restore neurological function. For recovery of movement in children with weakness on one side of their bodies, we will test whether brain connections spared by injury can be strengthened with non-invasive brain stimulation. For children with impaired visual attention, we investigate how patterned visual stimulation with a novel computer program can enable them to follow visual stimuli with their eyes. These approaches differ from conventional treatments in that they have been validated in animal models by researchers with a deep understanding of how structured neural activity affects brain plasticity.

Featured Clinical Trials

CLINICAL TRIAL: 
In-Progress / Currently Recruiting Participants
September 16, 2016
Motor Recovery
CLINICAL TRIAL: 
Forthcoming / Currently Recruiting Participants
June 24, 2017 to July 14, 2017
Cerebral Palsy, Motor Recovery

Research Projects

RESEARCH PROJECT: 
In Progress
Directed by Dr. Kathleen Friel, the goal is to use new methods of hand training to improve function in children with cerebral palsy affecting one half of the body.
RESEARCH PROJECT: 
In Progress
One way to alter brain excitability is to pass a weak current from a scalp electrode on one side to another electrode on the other side of the head.
RESEARCH PROJECT: 
In Progress
Visual experience is critical for the proper wiring of the visual system and for the acquisition of sight during development.

Technologies

Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a non-invasive brain stimulation therapy which uses constant, low current stimulation that is delivered to an area of the brain using electrodes on the head.